My Latest New Favorite Poet: Robert Hedin

My latest new favorite poet is Robert Hedin. The below poem (from American Life in Poetry: Column 519) does an amazing job of combining history, everyday life, and the disparate ways we all deal with grief. A juggling act, to be sure, handled with perfect precision by Mr. Hedin.

Raising the Titanic


I spent the winter my father died down in the basement,
under the calm surface of the floorboards, hundreds

of little plastic parts spread out like debris
on the table. And for months while the snow fell

and my father sat in the big chair by the Philco, dying,
I worked my way up deck by deck, story by story,

from steerage to first class, until at last it was done,
stacks, deck chairs, all the delicate rigging.

And there it loomed, a blazing city of the dead.
Then painted the gaping hole at the waterline

and placed my father at the railings, my mother
in a lifeboat pulling away from the wreckage.

I really love the last lines:

“And there it loomed, a blazing city of the dead.
Then painted the gaping hole at the waterline

and placed my father at the railings, my mother
in a lifeboat pulling away from the wreckage.”

They, so sadly, show that in the vein of “women and children first” he’s saving his mother by putting her on the lifeboat and leaving his father to perish with the ship (which is a truly poignant way of comparing it all to his father’s coming passing).

The full article can be found by clicking here.

Enjoy! 😀

Jamy

Advertisements

If Rhythm Is a Dancer, comment and dance with me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s