“Flirtation” by Rita Dove

Greetings Bloginistas!

Here’s a quick post of a gorgeous poem by one of the modern queens of poetry (and a personal idol), Rita Dove.

“Flirtation”

After all, there’s no need
to say anything

at first. An orange, peeled
and quartered, flares

like a tulip on a wedgewood plate
Anything can happen.

Outside the sun
has rolled up her rugs

and night strewn salt
across the sky. My heart

is humming a tune
I haven’t heard in years!

Quiet’s cool flesh—
let’s sniff and eat it.

There are ways
to make of the moment

a topiary
so the pleasure’s in

walking through.

Rita Dove, “Flirtation” from Museum (Pittsburgh: Carnegie Mellon University Press, 1983). Copyright © 1983 by Rita Dove

I would, as I usually do, share some of my favorite lines, but the entire thing is pretty damn perfect, so, in the words of Miranda Priestly:

That's All

Jamy :-D

“Mondrian”

Hello Sweet Bloginistas!

I was recently looking at some of my favorite artists and came across this image:

Abstract Cubes - Mondrian

I decided to write a poem that distilled my impression of his work into poetry the same way that he distilled the world down to squares of primary color. Enjoy! :-D

Mondrian

MECHANICAL GRIDS,
STAINED-GLASS
SQUARES,
APPEARING AND
APPEARING AND
APPEARING —
PRIMARY-COLORED
ORDERED
CHAOS.

SEMAPHORE FLAGS
SEWN TOGETHER
WITH
PAINTED THREAD;
A MYSTERIOUS MESSAGE
MUSEUM-INTENDED
ALTHOUGH
SEEMING TO BE
MARITIME TELEGRAPHY.

IT’S REDUCTIVE —
LIVE SCENES AND
BEAUTIFUL TREES
REDUCED TO
ROBOTIC
MOTHERBOARD SQUARES
PROGRAMMED TO RUN
SESAME STREET
COMPUTERS.

COMPUTERS THAT RUN
RED AND WHITE
AND
YELLOW AND BLACK
SIREN LIGHTS
ON HAPPY, CARTOON
TOTALITARIAN
POLICE CARS.

IT ALL MAKES SENSE
IF YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT LENSES
WITH WHICH TO
VIEW IT;

LENSES TINTED
THE MOTHER
COLORS,
GIVING US
THE SAME
UNDERSTANDING
AS DE HEER MONDRIAN:
THEY ARE
THE BEGINNING
AND
THE ENDING
OF
EVERYTHING.

© Jamy Sweet 2015-03-26

Here’s a link to his Wikipedia entry if you would like to read more about him:
Piet Mondrian
And a link to a site that functions as a portal to information on the life and work of Mondrian (it’s in Dutch, mostly, but there are some lovely pictures if you click around): Gemeentemuseum Den Haag
Lastly, Piet Mondrian at the Museum of Modern Art

Jamy :-D

My Latest New Favorite Poet: Robert Hedin

My latest new favorite poet is Robert Hedin. The below poem (from American Life in Poetry: Column 519) does an amazing job of combining history, everyday life, and the disparate ways we all deal with grief. A juggling act, to be sure, handled with perfect precision by Mr. Hedin.

Raising the Titanic


I spent the winter my father died down in the basement,
under the calm surface of the floorboards, hundreds

of little plastic parts spread out like debris
on the table. And for months while the snow fell

and my father sat in the big chair by the Philco, dying,
I worked my way up deck by deck, story by story,

from steerage to first class, until at last it was done,
stacks, deck chairs, all the delicate rigging.

And there it loomed, a blazing city of the dead.
Then painted the gaping hole at the waterline

and placed my father at the railings, my mother
in a lifeboat pulling away from the wreckage.

I really love the last lines:

“And there it loomed, a blazing city of the dead.
Then painted the gaping hole at the waterline

and placed my father at the railings, my mother
in a lifeboat pulling away from the wreckage.”

They, so sadly, show that in the vein of “women and children first” he’s saving his mother by putting her on the lifeboat and leaving his father to perish with the ship (which is a truly poignant way of comparing it all to his father’s coming passing).

The full article can be found by clicking here.

Enjoy! :-D

Jamy

Happy Ostara!

Ostara Description

What is Ostara?

I wanted to post a quick thought to all my lovely Bloginistas, wishing you all a WONDERFUL first day of Spring!

If you are Wiccan, then Happy Ostara and may all of your rituals be fruitful and successful.

Here is a great article on what it means, and the things it represents: Spring Equinox 2015: 3 Things To Know About The Pagan Ostara Festival

From my fellow Bloginista’s wonderful blog Cauldron and Brew: A Witch’s Blog, here are Three Ostara Rituals to practice on your own.

There’s also a fun Google Doodle to celebrate the day!

Blessed Be,

Jamy

A Love Letter To Charles Bukowski

Dear Charles,

I have written about you only once here, and that was a re-blog, and so I felt that I wanted, nay, NEEDED, to post directly to you, my inspiration, you who leaves me awe-struck, every time I read your words.

There are so many things that I could say, so many quotes that I could quote, so many poems and novels that I could cite, that this letter could be longer than In Search of Lost Time, so I shall TRY be brief.

I heard about you when I first met my partner some 20+ years ago. He knew of my desire to become a writer, and how much I loved writing and reading poetry. So he, being the most wonderful, thoughtful man in the world, gave me my first taste (“You Get So Alone at Times That It Just Makes Sense”) of the rare, exotic vintage of Thunderbird you pour on to your pages.

Once I devoured it, I was hooked, addicted to you, whom Time magazine called the “Laureate of American Lowlife”. But you are so much more than that, Hank, and we all know it.

You are a prophet, a humorist, an Angeleno, a California Shakespeare of the forgotten masses.

You are a great novelist AND a great poet, a rare combination, and a combination of which most authors can only dream (or are too envious to admit). A few examples (of the many!) that are my favorites of yours:

POEMS:

NOVELS:

Thank you (or maybe I should be thanking those gods that gave you this tremendous gift) for your words, Hank, I wish that I could have thanked you in person.

Love,

Jamy

BTW, for those of you that would like to “read more about him”, this is a great article about one woman’s “two degrees of separation” experience with the great Hank Chinaski.

My Latest New Favorite Poet: Don Welch

My latest new favorite poet is Don Welch. The below poem (from American Life in Poetry: Column 514) is a lovely example of the kindness of strangers who don’t give their actions a second thought.

Shuffling Out Toward Morning


After an hour in the infusion lab,
Taxol dripping into her,
fighting her cancer;

after sitting nauseous
next to a man
vomiting into a Pepsi cup,

she rose, palming the wall,
stooping only to pick up
a pen a doctor had dropped,

giving it back to the doctor
who had slipped it poorly
into his coat.

I especially enjoy the lines:

“she rose, palming the wall,
stooping only to pick up
a pen a doctor had dropped,”

They set up how selfless the subject of the poem is despite what she has been through herself. I have been first hand in the experience of dealing with a loved one going through heavy chemo, and to take a moment to simply pick-up a pen is both a gargantuan physical task and one of unsurpassed, simple, kindness.

The full article can be found by clicking here.

Enjoy! :-D

Jamy

A quick shout-out to a fabulous blog, “Dispatch From LA”

I wanted to expose you, my lovely Bloginistas, to a cool blog by an artist, Mary Ann Moss.

She’s an artist and fellow Angeleno whose “digital notebook” is definitely (if you love Art, Travel, and Writing, as I do) for you!

Her blog is: Dispatch From LA and you’ll find great things there.

I especially loved this one (but that’s probably because you all know I am a BIT [understatement, yes, I know] partial to poetry! ;-) ).

Her work with watercolors and re-purposed journals is truly wonderful and inspiring!

Enjoy! :-D

Jamy